Driving while under the influence of alcohol is likely viewed by most in Bremen to be the ultimate sign of irresponsibility. Yet many might feel secure in the assumption that most people will attempt to avoid putting themselves in such a situation. That does not necessarily mean, however, that motorists on the area’s roads are not at risk from the dangerous actions of others. For example, drowsy drivers can be as great a threat (if not more) than those that drive drunk. 

Indeed, according to information shared by the National Sleep Foundation, those who have gone 24 hours without sleep can experience impairments behind the wheel similar to those who have a blood-alcohol level of .10 (which is well above the legal limit). Even those who have been awake for 18 consecutive hours may perform as poorly behind the wheel who has a BAC of .05. 

The average adult requires 7-8 hours of restful sleep every night, yet that is a standard that many fall short of. Still, they may get behind the wheel feeling alert and attentive, only to have the effects of their drowsiness catch up to them while seated in their vehicles. One might wonder exactly how many drivers on the road around them may be driving drowsy. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in 25 adult drivers report having fallen asleep while driving in the last 30 days (one should also consider that this number represents only those who have admitted to this happening; the actual number might be much higher). 

While drowsy drivers likely do not intend to harm others (or cause damage to their property), it may be argued that their decision to drive in such a state is reckless, and thus opens them up to liability claims.