As a Georgia resident with a severe disability, you may have found the application process for Social Security Disability Insurance to be an uphill battle. Even if the U.S. Social Security Administration does, in fact, approve you for SSDI benefits, this is not a guarantee that you will continue to receive them for the foreseeable future. On the contrary, there are several circumstances that can develop that can impact your SSDI benefits eligibility, and any of them have the potential to affect your ability to continue to receive these payments that you have begun to rely on. 

According to the Motley Fool, one way you can make the SSA take a second look at your benefits eligibility is to have your condition improve to the point where it no longer meets the administration’s strict definition of “disability.” The SSA typically conducts periodic reviews of SSDI recipients to make sure they are still eligible to receive them, and if your condition improves to the point where you could reasonably return to work, you could potentially lose your SSDI benefits entirely. 

If you do decide to return to work on your own accord, this action, too, could place your SSDI benefits eligibility status in jeopardy. You may, however, be able to head back to work on a temporary trial basis while still receiving benefits to figure out whether working again is a reasonable option for you. 

A third way you can lose your SSDI benefits eligibility, meanwhile, is simply to reach the age of retirement. Once you do so, you will, in most cases, start receiving retirement, rather than disability, benefits from the government. However, your income level should stay relatively consistent, despite this change. 

This information about how you can potentially lose your SSDI benefits is educational in nature and not a replacement for legal advice.