There are certain life events that cause individuals to consider many what-if situations. Take getting a new job for example. New employees are faced with decisions regarding life insurance and other accounts regarding disability and dismemberment. No one likes to think about the possibility of being so severely injured that they are disabled and unable to work. However, this is a critical matter to consider.

While it is challenging to think about the possibility of disability, it is very difficult to deal with the challenges that living with a disability presents. Thus, many disabled individuals consider the possibility of easing or bettering their situation. Seeking Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits is one of those ways.

There are two programs that disabled individuals can go through the Social Security Administration for. The first is the Social Security Disability Insurance or SSDI program. This program is funded through payroll taxes. This means that the recipient of these benefits have worked for a set number of years, making contributions to the fund. Thus, they are able to receive these benefits if they have become disabled.

The second is the Supplemental Security Income or SSI program. This program has nothing to do with a recipient’s work history but rather is available for those with low income and few resources. This program is managed by the SSA and is not paid for by Social Security taxes. This program is designed for those unable to work because they have an injury or medical condition that is expected to last at least one year or result in their death.

When seeking SSD benefits, it is vital to understand what benefits one might qualify for. By obtaining more information and seeking legal guidance, disabled individuals can be sure to understand their options so they can protect their rights throughout the application process and if their application is initially denied.